Apply for a Protection Order

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It’s free to apply for a Protection Order.

You can apply for a Protection Order if you're in, or have been in, a domestic relationship with a person being violent.

If you're not in a domestic relationship with someone who is being violent towards you, you can apply for a Restraining Order.

Find out more about Restraining Orders

Forms to apply for a Protection Order

Application for Protection Order & Property Orders - DV3 [PDF, 222 KB]

Affidavit in support of application for Protection Order & Property Orders - DV4 [PDF, 220 KB]

Information sheet to accompany applications - DV4A [PDF, 641 KB]

Information for police if application made for Protection Order - DV6 [PDF, 124 KB]

If you want to keep your address secret, you’ll also need to fill in:

Notice of residential address and request for confidentiality - DV5 [PDF, 48 KB]

A lawyer can help you fill in the forms to apply for a Protection Order.

If you can’t afford a lawyer, you may be able to get legal aid. You don’t need to pay back legal aid for a Protection Order.

Legal aid

Protect children

If you think you need more help to protect your children, you can apply for a Parenting Order.  

Your lawyer can help you with this.

Find out more about protecting children

Stay in your home & keep the furniture

If you think you need more help to ensure you can stay in your home or keep furniture, you can use the same forms above.

Find out more about property and Protection Orders

If it’s urgent

If you need urgent protection, the court can make a temporary Protection Order, usually on the same day. We call this ‘without notice’ as you can get the Protection Order without the violent person being told first. They’re told once it’s in place.

Find out more about urgent help

After you apply

If your Protection Order was urgent and a temporary Protection Order was given to you, the violent person has 3 months to defend themselves in court. If they don’t, it becomes final and lasts until someone applies to the court to change it.

If your application is not urgent, the violent person is served with your application and will have the chance to defend themselves in court. The judge will listen to the evidence from both sides and decide if a Protection Order should be issued.

Find out more about how a Protection Order works

How long a Protection Order lasts

If the violent person doesn’t respond to the temporary Protection Order, it automatically becomes final after 3 months. It will last until either you or the violent person apply to the court to end it. The court will not end it unless it’s satisfied that the reasons for the Protection Order are no longer an issue and the violent person is no longer a risk to the person who applied.

Find out more about how a Protection Order can end

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